coefficient of thermal expansion of plywood floor dimensions

Dimensional Stability & Flatness - Performance Panels

The average coefficient of linear thermal expansion is about 3.4 x 10 -6 inch/inch per degree F for a plywood panel with 60 percent of the plies or less running perpendicular to the face. The coefficient of thermal expansion for panel thickness is approximately 16 x 10 -6 inch/inch per degree F.

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Thermal Properties - Performance Panels

The average coefficient of linear thermal expansion is about 3.4 x 10 -6 inch/inch per degree F for a plywood panel with 60 percent of the plies or less running perpendicular to the face. The coefficient of thermal expansion for panel thickness is approximately 16 x 10 -6 inch/inch per degree F.

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Table of Linear Thermal Expansion Coefficients for Building .

For a ten foot long section of material (120 inches), that means an increase of 120 millionths of an inch for a one degree change. For a 100 degree increase, that means the original ten foot section will add 12,000 millionths of an inch to its length. The original ten foot section will now be 10 feet and 0.012 inches long.

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Thermal Properties of Plywood - eHow

As the temperature around a piece of wood changes, so does the size of that piece of wood. Each variety has a specific coefficient for thermal expansion, referred to as "alpha." The denser a piece of wood is, the more it will expand. In plywood, though, this is about 2x10^ (-6) inches for every degree change in Fahrenheit.

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Thermal Properties of Plywood | eHow

Thermal expansion doesn't have much of an effect on plywood; it expands minimally per inch of the panel's length for every one degree Fahrenheit of temperature increase, and that's only when the majority of the panel's plies have grain that's perpendicular to the panel surface.

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How to Calculate Wood Shrinkage and Expansion | Popular .

Step 3: Determine the dimensional change coefficient of the species. Dimensional Change Coefficient::A number that reflects how much a certain species of wood will change in width. Formula works only when wood is between 6 percent and 14 percent moisture, but this is a fair range for furniture.

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